Condominium Corporation Terminology

WHO’S WHO

Property Manager

  • Advise and provide administrative, managerial, and operational counsel to the association governing body
  • Exhibit professionalism and loyalty to the principal (the Board)
  • Exercise diligence in performing duties on the principals behalf
  • Account for financial activities covered by the Management Agreement
  • Perform onsite property inspections
  • Solicit and evaluate bids for association services
  • Supervise maintenance activities and contractor performance
  • Oversee and authorize payment for primary association services
  • Know and abide by The Condominium Act, Corporation’s Declaration and Bylaws

The Board of Directors

Depending on the management agreement, some of the following responsibilities can be turned over to a managing company

President

  • Chief executive officer and leader of the Condominium Corporation
  • Presides at all meetings of the board and membership
  • Executes legal documents on behalf of the association
  • Sets meeting agendas and controls all meetings
  • Represents the board before the residents
  • May have nominating, if not appointment, responsibility for all committees

Vice President

  • Performs all of the duties of the president in his/her absence
  • Typically shares some of the burden of the president regarding appearances, liaison, public hearings, etc.
  • Usually assigned liaison responsibility to specific staff or contractors, and to specific committees

Secretary

  • Prepares and distributes board and membership meeting agendas, minutes, and materials referred to in minutes
  • Maintains minutes and book on all meetings
  • Maintains book of resolutions
  • Maintains all official records, including official correspondence, contracts, membership roster, etc.
  • Receives, verifies, and maintains all proxies
  • Attests, by signature, to the legitimacy of certain documents

Treasurer

  • Works with appropriate staff, contractors, and committees to develop and submit annual operating budget for approval
  • Maintains adequate records of all association financial transactions
  • Maintains roster of disbursement of funds, as authorized
  • Prepares period financial reports
  • Arranges, subject to board approval, an independent audit of financial affairs

PERSPECTIVES OF BOARD, HOMEOWNER, AND MANAGER

Board of Directors Perspective

  • Maintaining the value of the property and a good quality of life for the residential community
  • Governing smoothly
  • Enforces rules
  • Establishing and keeping budget

Homeowners Perspective

  • Most care a great deal about residences
  • Will want service from manager and decisions from Board that will provide a good quality of life
  • Problems may arise when expectations are too high or not realistic; this can occur when interests are too specialized or unique

Managers Perspective

  • Working in balance with homeowners, board, and realities of management companies business(possible friction)
  • Problem-solver
  • Multi-task oriented

GOVERNING DOCUMENTS

  • All documents that regulate the community life
  • Documents may vary depending on type of Corporation (condo, townhome, etc.)
    • Condominuim Act
    • Declaration & Description or Title/Deed
    • Bylaws
    • Rules and Regulations
    • Plats of Survey and Easement Agreements (may be separate, often included in the declaration)

ACCOUNTING BASICS

  • Accrual Method of Accounting-keeps track of all financial activities, including revenue as it is earned (as opposed to when it is received) and expenses as the obligation is incurred (as opposed to when it is paid). This makes possible a more accurate determination of the financial condition of the association at any point in time. Also, this is a better method for multi-year tracking of capital reserves credits and deficiencies. The primary disadvantage is the greater complexity and technical knowledge that is needed to maintain the records, understand the reports, etc.
  • Reserve Fund Study-the Board has the obligation to repair and replace major capital facilities, buildings, and equipment of the association. The ideal method of providing for these future expenses is the establishment of a capital reserves system and budget to assure that such funds are available when needed. With knowledge that the future holds predictable major expenditures for repair and replacement of facilities and equipment, the association could begin the gradual accumulation of funds through a reserve account to meet all or a portion of that expense when it comes due.